Rutgers Cancer Institute Establishes The Omar Boraie Chair in Genomic Science

Newswise reported on October 21, 2015, that the Omar Boraie Chair in Genomic Science has been established at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.[http://newswise.com/articles/omar-boraie-chair-in-genomic-science-established-at-rutgers-cancer-institute]. This will highly help to promote research in the field of precision medicine here. These endowed chairs are considered as the gold standard in the field of higher education. They express the commitment of a university at the highest level of its academic discipline by ensuring its continued support as well as progression.

 

 

This chair has been named for New Brunswick developer Omar Boraie, and he made a $1.5 million pledge to support it. In fact, the Omar Boraie Chair has been established as a part of Rutgers University’s campaign of ’18 Chair Challenge’. Here an anonymous donor provides a $1.5 million match to each of these 18 new chairs. This will lead to a $3 million endowment in each case.

 

 

This field of genomic science along with precision medicine is changing the way in which medical professionals are approaching the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. It is a relatively new field as it involves analysis and treating of tumors on a genetic level. This allows oncologists to be able to prescribe individualized therapies leading to much better outcomes for the patients. Even President Obama had attested to its national importance. Hence in his recent State of the Union Address, he had announced the launching of a national Precision Medicine Initiative that is focused on finding cures for cancer and such other related diseases.

 

 

There are some cancer centers that are into next-generation gene sequencing on tumors. This is being done for research purposes. Rutgers Cancer Institute is one of those facilities. It is the only one in the state that makes use of genomic sequencing as a precision medicine approach towards providing patient care. Do note that Genomic sequencing has always been valuable as it helps to find novel therapies for rare cancers and poorer prognoses. It is also useful for all those treatment options that have either been limited or ineffective. Such advances in precision medicine have enhanced the ability to classify cancers into subpopulations having similar characteristics but with different genetics. This helps to predict better patient outcomes besides determining individualized cancer therapies.

 

 

Significant advances are being made at Rutgers Cancer Institute with precision medicine for all those patients whose cancers are not responding now. Applying this science to all cancer patients can be a breakthrough. http://www.njbiz.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20161220/NJBIZ01/161219963/developer-waseem-boraie-debunks-5-myths-about-doing-business-in-ac-after-breaking-ground-on-81m-project&template=mobileart